What We do

Our Model

 

Nature's Nectar works with local farmers in the Northwestern Province of Zambia, creating a sustainable income and protecting local forests through beekeeping. With few resources and little access to market, rural Zambian farmers are challenged to find a viable income that doesn't negatively impact the environment. Honey has been a major crop and income source for farmers in Northwestern Province for hundreds of years, and with just  a few changes we can keep this practice alive. Beekeeping creates not only a sustainable income for rural Zambians, but it protects their local forests for generations to come.

Each beekeeper we work with receives a minimum of 10 Kenyan top bar hives. As the guaranteed buyers of all honey coming from these hives, Nature's Nectar creates an easy income that protects the local Miombo woodland. With the bees doing most of the work, this model fits in easily with the farming lifestyle.   It can be difficult for women to find independence, ways to build wealth, and social advancement in Zambia, especially in a rural setting. With 50% of all farmers being women, we work to create equal opportunities. 

Each beekeeper we work with receives a minimum of 10 Kenyan top bar hives. As the guaranteed buyers of all honey coming from these hives, Nature's Nectar creates an easy income that protects the local Miombo woodland. With the bees doing most of the work, this model fits in easily with the farming lifestyle. It can be difficult for women to find independence, ways to build wealth, and social advancement in Zambia, especially in a rural setting. With 50% of all farmers being women, we work to create equal opportunities. 

Before modern beekeeping was introduced, farmers would strip the bark of a tree to create a beehive. As the honey market expanded, so did the amount of bark hives. This has slowly killed thousands of trees in this local Miombo woodland. With our hives gradually replacing these bark hives, we can ensure the protection of this forest and create a long lasting income source.

Before modern beekeeping was introduced, farmers would strip the bark of a tree to create a beehive. As the honey market expanded, so did the amount of bark hives. This has slowly killed thousands of trees in this local Miombo woodland. With our hives gradually replacing these bark hives, we can ensure the protection of this forest and create a long lasting income source.